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The Impact of Residents (and Training) on Patients

dV-T Maestro 2Like any new technology, a lot of focus has been placed on ensuring that new users of robotic surgery are adequately trained. Simulation has had a large part to play with this. As the technology has become more mainstream, training requirements have moved from not only training existing surgeons but to ensuring that residents and fellows develop the required skill levels to ensure that they can adapt to the new technologies used in their practice.

Earlier this year we discussed a paper published by the EAU on their curriculum aimed at ensuring that fellows followed a clear curriculum at the end of which they would be deemed to be safe and competent to operate on patients independently. As with many ways of teaching surgery, the procedure is broken into specific steps that the trainee must master before being allowed to carry the whole procedure.

A typical prostatectomy is divided into the 7 following steps: bladder takedown, endopelvic fascia, bladder neck, seminal vesicle/vas deferens, pedicle/nerve sparing, apex, and anastomosis. Typically a trainee will be given a maximum time, of say 30 minutes,to complete one of these tasks during a procedure. Once they have shown that they have mastered the tasks, they will be allowed to move onto another task and eventually to the whole procedure. This is obviously easier to accomplish on parts of the anatomy and procedures that can be standardized.

Until recently, there have not been many studies looking into this practice to see what the potential patient impact could be comparing when a surgery was performed by just the one attending surgeon to one where parts of the case had been handed over to the resident.

Dr. Thiel from the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, has published a paper on just this topic comparing 140 cases where just an attending was involved in the surgery to 232 cases when a resident took over part of the case.

There were no differences in some key clinical outcomes such as positive margins, length of stay, catheter days, readmissions or re-operations when comparing surgeon only to resident –involved cases. There was, however, a difference seen in mean operative time between procedures that were surgeon only cases vs. resident involved (190.4 Min vs. 206.4 Min, P= 0.003)

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The researchers also noted that residents were more likely to be involved with at least 1 procedural step after the purchase of the dV-Trainer.

Mimic believes in this way of training residents which is why the Maestro AR set of procedural curricula we have developed are divided into the procedural steps that a resident will be required to learn. We have been able to marry narrated 3D video content with didactic exercises that allow for a student’s ability to be tested. At the appropriate point, the correct psychomotor skill is inserted to make sure that the student can match the skills required for the procedural step.

Mimic currently has the following available:

  • Right Partial Nephrectomy, Dr. Indibir Gill, USC
  • Hysterectomy, Dr. Arnold Advincula, Columbia University
  • Inguinal Hernia Repair, Dr. Rick Low, John C. Lincoln Hospital
  • Prostatectomy (Si), Dr. Henk van der Poel, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital/Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam
  • Prostatectomy (Xi), Dr. Vip Patel, Florida Hospital
  • In Development for Q4 ‘16 Release:
    • Lower Anterior Resection, Dr. Eduardo Parra, Florida Hospital

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